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I am Reading Latin Stories: Set of Four Books
 

Set of four new Latin books for children aged 4-8 by author and emerita Latin teacher Rose Williams:


  • Ursus et Porcus — Bear meets pig in this forest fable of how to get along.
  • Taurus Rex — The barnyard bully learns a valuable lesson on the value of friendship.
  • Rena Rhinocerus — A baby rhinoceros knows there's a bump on his nose: a story about growing up.
  • Octavus Octopus — Young Octavus discovers what's right about where he lives.

 
 

Latin Everywhere, Everyday: A Latin Phrase Workbook
 

This workbook of Latin phrases and mottoes is filled with exercises, projects, and games designed for students in grades 7-10. There are three parts to the workbook: sententiae or Latin phrases, abbreviations, and mottoes. The first section contains 180 Latin phrases, one for each day of the school year. There are five phrases on each page so that students can see a whole week's work at once. A variety of exercises helps students master each group of phrases. The second section of the workbook contains Latin mottoes of states, schools, colleges, and organizations. The third section reviews the 29 Latin abbreviations that were introduced in section one. All three sections are filled with interesting derivatives, engaging information, delightful facts, and ample exercises.

 
 

Latin Everywhere, Everyday: A Latin Phrase Workbook Teacher's Manual with audio
 

This teacher's manual to Latin Everywhere, Everyday contains the answers to all the exercises in the student workbook along with additional exercises and answers for those who have studied Latin. Some additional games and projects are also included in the teacher's manual and the audio download offers a Latin pronunciation of each phrase, motto, and abbreviation.

 
 

Octavus Octopus: Octavus the Octopus
 

Octavus Octopus is the second of the four-book "I Am Reading Latin Stories" Series. Each book is independent, but Octavus has a few more words than does the first book Ursus et Porcus and makes use of a little more grammar.

 
 

Quomodo Invidiosulus nomine GRINCHUS Christi natalem Abrogaverit How the Grinch Stole Christmas in Latin
 

Quomodo Invidiosulus nomine GRINCHUS Christi natalem Abrogaverit (The Latin version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas) features Dr. Seuss' original artwork and a translation that echoes the love of word play and the rhythmic narrative of the world's best-selling author of children's books. Jennifer Morrish Tunberg and Terence O. Tunberg recreate the enchanting poetry of the English original.

 
 

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