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Shock-Headed Peter: in Latin - English - German
 

You'd REALLY better watch out: cautionary tales that will curl your hair, too: in Latin, German, English
Dr. Heinrich Hoffmann's Der Struwwelpeter, the best known German children's book, was first published in Frankfurt in 1845. "Shock-Headed Peter" or "Slovenly Peter" (as it is mostly known in English speaking countries) has conquered the children's book market of the world not only with dozens of translations but also literally hundreds of imitations, adaptations, take-offs and parodies. These "merry stories and funny pictures for children between 3 and 6 years," as Dr. Hoffmann termed them, are cautionary tales, by turns macabre, touching, and wickedly funny. Where else does every recalcitrant child or cruel adult get his or her "deserts," and that within a few pages?

 
 

Taurus Rex: King Bull
 

Taurus Rex is the third of the four-book "I Am Reading Latin Stories" Series. Each book is independent, but Taurus has a few more words than do the other two as well as a little more grammar.

 
 

The Labors of Aeneas: What a Pain It Was to Found the Roman Race
 

This paperback book retells the story of The Aeneid in a light-hearted and understandable manner with humorous insights and asides. This volume makes Books I-XII of Vergil's Aeneid enjoyable and easy to follow and may be used in conjunction with the Latin text of Vergil's Aeneid in high school classrooms.

 
 

Ubi Fera Sunt: Where the Wild Things Are in Latin
 

Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers is pleased to announce the arrival of Ubi Fera Sunt, the first Latin translation (by Richard A. LaFleur) of this beloved children's story.


This lively translation faithfully and playfully recasts Sendak’s writing into classical Latin. It includes the beautifully remastered images employed in the fiftieth anniversary edition.

 
 

Under His Father's Wing, Marcus de Auguribus Discit
 

Encounter stories of ancient Greek and Roman augurs, special seers who interpreted bird signs—entirely in Latin!


Marcus, a young Roman boy, has been struggling to show his father Titus that he is simply not cut out for life as an augur. Why can’t he seek adventure and glory as a soldier? Titus, in turn, can’t quite get Marcus to understand the importance of augury, especially its role in keeping Roman soldiers safe. Titus has seen the dangers of war firsthand and fears for his son’s future. By telling Marcus stories of legendary Greek and Roman augurs, Titus hopes to convey some tough truths about military life—and why divining the gods’ will is essential. Along the way, he also reveals how augury has been woven into the fabric of Rome’s very existence.

 
 

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