From Romulus to Romulus Augustulus: Roman History for the New Millennium
 

Readers will delight in the fascinating stories of Rome—the quirky, the gory, and the momentous. This book will serve as the perfect companion for the student beginning to study Latin or as an accessible introduction to Roman history for the general reader. Recognizing the symbiotic relationship between literature and the period in which it was produced, From Romulus to Romulus Augustulus: Roman History for the New Millennium provides a comprehensive overview of Roman history and Latin literature.

 
 

Gildersleeve's Latin Grammar
 

Gildersleeve's Latin Grammar is the classic, comprehensive review of etymology, Latin grammar and syntax, and prosody. Favored by many students and teachers, Gildersleeve's Latin Grammar was enhanced in 1997 with a new foreword and comprehensive bibliography.

In the words of Basil L. Gildersleeve, "Rightly interpreted, grammar is the culmination of philological study, and not its rudiment . . . No study of literature can yield its highest result without the close study of language, and consequently the close study of grammar."?

 
 

Gildersleeve's Latin Grammar
 

Gildersleeve's Latin Grammar is the classic, comprehensive review of etymology, Latin grammar and syntax, and prosody. Favored by many students and teachers, Gildersleeve's Latin Grammar was enhanced in 1997 with a new foreword and comprehensive bibliography.

In the words of Basil L. Gildersleeve, "Rightly interpreted, grammar is the culmination of philological study, and not its rudiment . . . No study of literature can yield its highest result without the close study of language, and consequently the close study of grammar."?

 
 

Graphic Latin Grammar Cards
 
These reference cards contain paradigms of regular, irregular, and deponent verbs, nouns, adjectives, pronouns, and numerals; plus charts of prepositions and adverbs; and a guide to syntax of cases and syntax of nouns - all in an easily readable and highly durable format.
 
 

Homo sum; humani nil a me alienum puto: I am a human being; I consider nothing human alien to me
 

Leonardo da Vinci's Vitruvian Man, found in the Gallerie dell'Accademia in Venice, is behind this quote by Terence.