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Reading the Gospel of St Mark in Greek: A Beginning
 

Reading the Gospel of St. Mark in Greek: A Beginning empowers students to read and appreciate the Gospel of Mark and biblical Greek as a whole. The introduction presents a summary description of the alphabet, pronunciation, accents, and grammar, making simple and brief comparisons between English and Greek. The main body of the book includes the Greek text, running vocabulary, and notes on each page. The format allows for rapid reading, comprehension, and retention. Each new word is repeated fifteen times in the running vocabulary. Any words not mastered after this can be found in the vocabulary list in the back. This text is inclusive and allows a reader to enjoy the Greek language and the Gospel of Mark without the need for a separate dictionary or grammar book.

 
 

Reading the Gospel of St. John in Greek: A Beginning
 

The Gospel of John—Made Accessible to All
With Introduction, Notes, Vocabulary, and Grammatical Appendix

 
 

Reading the Gospel of St. Matthew in Greek: A Beginning
 

Reading the Gospel of St. Matthew in Greek: A Beginning empowers students at all levels to read and appreciate the Gospel of St. Matthew and biblical Greek as a whole. The combination of text, vocabulary, and grammatical notes on one page enhances the reading experience for both practiced and beginning readers of Greek. Readers with training in classical, Homeric, or biblical Greek will find that the format enables rapid reading, comprehension, and retention. Readers with little to no Greek language training will be able to work directly with text from the New Testament, in conjunction with the introduction and appendix, in order to develop proficiency with biblical grammar, vocabulary, and idiom.

 
 

Theocritus: Select Poems
 
This selection of the poems of Theocritus clearly illustrates his creative genius and rare powers of observation. Dover's introduction and extensive notes offer revealing insights into both the writing and the life and times of the poet.
 
 

They Said It First The Wisdom of the Ancient Greeks and Romans
 

They Said It First provides a unique twist on quotation collections: ancient Greek and Roman sayings, alongside English translations, are paired with their more modern counterparts. The likes of W. E. B. Dubois and Mark Twain may have eloquently expressed eternal truths and pithy witticisms—but frequently, Homer or Seneca the Younger got there first.

 
 

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