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Ten Years of Classicists: Dissertations & Outcomes 1988-1997
 

This valuable reference tool contains three directories of graduate students who have at least begun a dissertation in classics or classical archaeology from 1988 to 1997. Directories are arranged by alphabetical order, field of specialty including dissertation title, and initial academic appointments.

 
 
Lucretius: Selections from De rerum natura
 

There are few ancient authors as compelling as Lucretius: scientist, poet, philosopher, passionate observer of nature. While Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil have long vied for first place in the classical curriculum, Lucretius' treatment of universal human matters rightfully earns him a place in their company.

 
 
Why Horace? A Collection of Interpretations
 
Why Horace? William Anderson in his introduction offers compelling reasons, echoed by the interpretative essays chosen for this volume.

 
 
Vergil's Aeneid 10 & 12: Pallas & Turnus
 

This annotated and selected intermediate-level Latin text is designed as a supplement to Pharr's Aeneid, for college, AP*, and high school classrooms. This edition provides the current AP* syllabus passages from the last six books of Vergil's masterpiece, the Aeneid. It is excellent for college use, as well, to give students using Pharr a sample of readings beyond the first six books.

 
 
The Aristocratic Ideal and Selected Papers
 

Donlan's 1980 seminal work, The Aristocratic Ideal in Ancient Greece: Attitudes of Superiority from Homer to the End of the Fifth Century B.C., in combination with the reprinting of eight of Donlan's other related works, spanning the years 1970-1994.

 
 
Quomodo Invidiosulus nomine GRINCHUS Christi natalem Abrogaverit How the Grinch Stole Christmas in Latin
 

Quomodo Invidiosulus nomine GRINCHUS Christi natalem Abrogaverit (The Latin version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas) features Dr. Seuss' original artwork and a translation that echoes the love of word play and the rhythmic narrative of the world's best-selling author of children's books. Jennifer Morrish Tunberg and Terence O. Tunberg recreate the enchanting poetry of the English original.

 
 
Tonight They All Dance: 92 Latin & English Haiku
 

Elegant simplicity: Haiku in Latin, with English translation. Tonight They All Dance can serve as a primer to the composition of Latin verse and, as such, can lend students and scholars alike insight into the intricacies and joys of writing poetry in a non-native language. Haiku, with its short form and engaging content, is the ideal instrument for a first exploration of Latin poetic composition. By modeling the composition of Latin haiku and translating both the substance and the form into English haiku, students will begin to understand the challenges of accurate and beautiful translation. It is only through such intimate experience that a true sense of Latin verse can be gained.

 
 
Vergil's Aeneid: Books I-VI With Introduction, Notes, Vocabulary, and Grammatical Appendix
 
This is the book that revolutionized Latin textbooks, with its student-friendly format of vocabulary and notes on the same page as the Latin text, and unique pull-out vocabulary of most-often repeated words.
 
 
Quomodo Invidiosulus nomine GRINCHUS Christi natalem Abrogaverit: How the Grinch Stole Christmas in Latin
 

Quomodo Invidiosulus nomine GRINCHUS Christi natalem Abrogaverit (The Latin version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas) features Dr. Seuss' original artwork and a translation that echoes the love of word play and the rhythmic narrative of the world's best-selling author of children's books. Jennifer Morrish Tunberg and Terence O. Tunberg recreate the enchanting poetry of the English original.

 
 
Why Vergil?: A Collection of Interpretations
 

We lack automatic and simple answers to the question "Why Vergil?" — or many similar questions for that matter: why literature, why art, especially why old literature — and at that — why literature in an old language? Yet even after 2,000 years, the voice of Vergil still resonates with the universal human cry.

—From the Introduction

 
 
Res Gestae Divi Augusti
 

This unadapted Latin text of the emperor Augustus' autobiography is designed to allow the intermediate/advanced student at the high school or college level to read Latin rapidly, without having constantly to consult a dictionary or grammar. The facing vocabulary and comprehensive grammar notes facilitate a rapid read. The Res Gestae reveals as much about Augustus and his accomplishments through what it omits as what it contains. This primary document allows students rare access to non-literary historical Latin, to the most impressive of all Latin inscriptions: the Res Gestae of Rome's first emperor, his accomplishments as he sought to have them presented.

 
 
Roman Verse Satire: Lucilius to Juvenal: A Selection with an Introduction, Text, Translations, and Notes
 

Satura quidem tota nostra est Satire is altogether ours was the claim of the Roman Quintilian, the first century C.E. commentator on rhetorical and literary matters, for the literary world had not previously seen the likes of satire. Not for the faint of heart, satire is characterized by its wide-ranging themes, its tone that is sometimes humorous and distinctively biting, and its undeniable perspicacity. As an antidote to life's frustrations and human foibles, satire is the undisputed queen of genres.

 
 
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