BC Webinars
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Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers 2018 Winter/Spring Webinars


Amazons: The Myth, the Meme, the Reality

Tuesday, March 13, 2018 6:00–7:00 PM ET
Presenter: Tara Sewell-Lasater, University of Houston


Until recently, the Amazons were believed to be a mythological group of women who had been invented by Greek epic poets to provide their heroes an interesting and outlandish "other" to fight. Works on the Amazons written in the 1970s, 80s, and even into the 90s include explanations such as: "The Amazon is a dream that men created, an image of a superlative female that men constructed to flatter themselves."1 Other works pointed out the futility of identifying myth versus fact: "there is no way, through modern historical methods, to affirm or deny the Amazons' existence."2 While the Amazons were used by the Greeks as an "other," this presentation will argue that it is possible to confirm the Amazons were based on a real people through the use of literary and archaeological evidence. More importantly, the myth of these warrior women eventually became a meme, a type of cultural memory or symbol that was vastly different from the original culture on which they were based. This meme was used by the Greeks as a contrast to Greek life and social norms.


1Abby Wettan Kleinbaum, The War Against the Amazons (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1983), 1.
2William Blake Tyrrell, Amazons: A Study in Athenian Mythmaking (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984), xiii.


Tara Sewell-Lasater is working toward a PhD in ancient history at the University of Houston. Her research and dissertation focus on Ptolemaic queens and their coinage. She earned a BA in history and a second in archaeology from Baylor University. Sewell-Lasater completed archaeological field work with the Anglo-American Project in Pompeii. She earned an MA in history, with a focus on the Pharaonic Period in Egypt, from the University of Texas at San Antonio. She has taught ancient and medieval civilization courses at San Antonio College and Texas A&M–San Antonio. Although her doctoral research focuses on Egyptian numismatics, Sewell-Lasater enjoys researching the overall history of the ancient and classical world, and she relishes the opportunity to focus on the role women played in that history.


Using Roman Coins and Material Culture in the Active Classroom

Tuesday, March 20, 2018 6:00–7:00 PM ET
Presenters: Thomas “TJ” Howell, Belchertown High School, and Edward Zarrow, PhD, Westwood High School


These two seasoned high school Latin instructors enthusiastically incorporate spoken Latin in their classrooms. In this webinar, they demonstrate a lesson using a set of representative Roman coins as a stimulus for active Latin.


TJ Howell has taught Latin and Greek for seventeen years at Belchertown High School. He conducts a weekly Latin Conversation Hour in Amherst, MA. He was a 2010 finalist for Massachusetts Teacher of the Year. The Classical Association of New England recognized Howell for excellence in teaching and service to the classics with its prestigious Matthew Wiencke Award in 2015. Howell earned his MAT from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.


ACTFL 2016 Teacher of the Year Edward Zarrow, PhD, has taught Latin at Westwood High School for over a decade. He won the Wolverine Award in 2012, an annual honor the district's Parent-Teacher Association gives to an educator who consistently uses innovative methods to get youth to learn. He served as president of Classical Association of Massachusetts, 2014–2016, and has served as CANE Coordinator of Educational Programs since 2014. In 2015, Zarrow was named Massachusetts Foreign Language Teacher of the Year by the Massachusetts Foreign Language Association. As ACTFL 2016 National Foreign Language Teacher of the Year, Zarrow has crisscrossed the country speaking at regional associations of foreign language teachers. He earned his PhD at Yale University. Check out the The Boston Globe's feature on Zarrow.


Women and War in the Roman Empire

Tuesday, April 10, 2018 6:00–7:00 PM ET
Presenter: Caitlin Gillespie, Columbia University


This webinar discusses the concept of a dux femina (commander woman) in Roman literature from Vergil's Dido onward, providing examples of both positive and negative ways in which women became leaders in the Roman world. We then focus on Boudica as an example of this literary topos and explore how Boudica's complex literary portrait illustrates the difficulties in assessing a female barbarian warrior through Roman terms.


Caitlin C. Gillespie is a Lecturer in Classics at Columbia University. She received her PhD in Classical Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. She holds an MA in Classical Studies from UPenn as well as a Master of Studies in Greek and Latin Languages and Literature from Wadham College, University of Oxford. Gillespie delivered the Harvard University Latin Commencement Oration ‘Campus Somniorum.’ She has merited a Foundation Hardt research scholarship, a Loeb Classical Library Foundation grant, and a Salvatori Research Award. Gillespie’s work explores the intersection between material culture and literary representations of women in the early Roman Empire. Her book Boudica: Woman Warrior of Roman Britain was recently published by Oxford University Press.


Some Tech Tips Useful for Review

Tuesday, May 1, 2018 6:00–7:00 PM ET
Presenter: Lynne West, Bellarmine College Preparatory School


A wide variety of technology tools are available to help provide effective and fun review opportunities for our students. This one-hour webinar will address several tools that can enhance and enliven the Latin classroom. Participants will have the opportunity to explore web-based tools that are valuable additions to both the elementary and advanced Latin curriculum. We will especially address methods and tools for reviewing vocabulary, grammar, history, and culture with the hope that you might implement them for your end-of-year review. Participants will come away with a deeper understanding of both the role that technology can play in review and how to integrate it effectively.


Lynne West has been teaching Latin at Bellarmine College Preparatory in San Jose since 2001. She has served as chair of the Modern and Classical Languages Department and is currently an instructional specialist in addition to her Latin teaching. West regularly teaches a technology class for teachers at the Taft School's Education Center in Watertown, Connecticut, and contributes a monthly "Tech Tip" to B-C's eLitterae. In 2015, West was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship for her innovative teaching, and she spent much of the 2015–2016 school year at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands.



If you have suggestions for future webinars, please contact Don Sprague.




To participate in Bolchazy-Carducci Publisher sponsored webinars you will need high-speed internet access, computer speakers/headphones, current web browser with updated "Flash Player"*, and the link to the webinar virtual meeting space, which is provided in your webinar invitation.

*Current web browsers: Internet Explorer 8, FireFox 3, Google Chrome, Safari 4 or 5. Flash Player available from Adobe.com: get.adobe.com/flashplayer/. Consult your school IT dept.

For Professional Development
Participation is free. All webinars provide opportunity for participants to ask questions.

Learn lots — attend each presentation. Sign up for this professional development webinar. Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers will provide documentation of your participation.