Terence O. Tunberg, PhD

Terence O. Tunberg, PhD

Terence Owen Tunberg is a professor in the Department of Classical Languages and teaches in the Honors Program at the University of Kentucky. Tunberg received a BA and MA in classics from the University of Southern California and a PhD from the University of Toronto. He also studied at the University of London's MA Programme in Medieval Studies and Ancient History. He has published widely on medieval and neo-Latin and is founder of the electronic Latin journal Retiarius. Tunberg is the coauthor with Milena Minkova of Latin for the New Millennium, Level 1 (Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 2008), Latin for the New Millennium, Level 2 (Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 2009), and Reading Livy's Rome: Selections from Books I-VI of Livy's Ab Urbe Condita (Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 2005); Tunberg is the cotranslator with Jennifer Morrish Tunberg of The Giving Tree in Latin: Arbor Alma (Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 2002), Quomodo Invidiosulus nomine Grinchus Christi natalem Abrogaverit: How the Grinch Stole Christmas in Latin (Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 1998), and Cattus Petasatus: The Cat in the Hat in Latin (Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 2000).


Terence O. Tunberg, PhD's Books

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  • Latin for the New Millennium: Student Text Level 1

    Authors: Milena Minkova, Terence O. Tunberg   By authors: Milena Minkova, Terence Tunberg
    Product Code: 5602
    ISBN: 978-0-86516-560-1

    Description & More Details

    A complete introductory course to the Latin language, suitable for both high school and college students, consists of two volumes, each accompanied by a teacher's manual and students' workbooks. The strategy employed for teaching and learning incorporates the best of both the reading approach and the more abstract grammatical method. The choice of vocabulary in each chapter reflects ancient authors commonly studied for the AP* Latin examinations. There are exercises designed for oral use, as well as a substantial core of more conventional exercises in each chapter. The readings, pictures, and supplementary inserts on cultural information illuminate Roman life, civilization, Roman history, and mythology, as well as the continuing use of Latin after antiquity and its vigorous literary tradition in such periods as the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Each chapter also includes derivatives, the influence of Latin vocabulary on English, and selected proverbs or common Latin sayings.