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Looking at Latin: A Grammar for Pre-College

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Author: Anna Andresian
Product Code: 6153
ISBN: 978-0-86516-615-8
Pages: 288
Availability: In stock.
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Looking at Latin is a complete illustrated grammar reference book for all levels of pre-college Latin, from middle school through high school.


Lessons are designed to cover single topics—from the subject nominative to the impersonal passive periphrastic—which allows for flexibility in the order in which lessons are covered. Innovative visual elements bring clarity and energy to the presentation of grammatical material, with arrows and colored text emphasizing and connecting important points. Information is delivered via small text boxes that allow students to use a step-by-step approach to learning forms and syntax, and comprehensive example sentences illustrate each topic in detail. Abundant color illustrations add personality and humor, producing a visual appeal unusual to Latin grammars.


Whether the student needs to review declensions and conjugations or would like to learn how to use constructions such as the ablative absolute or purpose clauses, this is the book to use.


A class set of this new grammar, Looking at Latin, is a must for every middle and high school Latin classroom. Students continuing in Latin will surely want to purchase personal copies.


Special Features

  • detailed table of contents makes finding topics easy
  • topics are arranged by grammatical category, making the book as useful for later review and reference as for initial learning
  • dynamic layout with text boxes, arrows, examples, and color illustrations
  • design expressly targets Latin students from middle school through high school
  • illustrations represent the diversity of the modern world


Errata:

  • p. 14: Use calcar (spur) as your i-stem -ar example (instead of nectar)
  • p. 19: The noun dies (day) should be listed as masculine (though it sometimes can be feminine).
  • p. 34: The implied verb in sentence #2 should be "to be enthusiastic."
  • p. 39: Sentence #3 should be Lūcius dē vī absolvētur.
  • p. 56: The meaning of licet should be “it is allowed”
  • p. 67: The +E in top box should be removed. Also, there should not be a long mark over ex in the second example sentence.
  • p. 68: There should not be a long mark over ex in the top box.
  • p. 74–5: “During” should be added to the top box on p. 74 and removed from the top box on p. 75. The note on “DURING” on p. 75 should be part of page 74.
  • p. 125: The meaning of pessimē is “worst.”
  • p. 180: Box titled “Tense forms with ‘E’ ”: docēbit and mittit should be docēbis and mittis.
  • p. 184: Future Tense of sum is erō, eris, erit, erimus, eritis, erunt. The 3rd person singular needs to be corrected.
  • p. 238: Top right yellow circle should contain rather than ut nōn.

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Reviews

Review by: LeaAnn Osburn, elitterae - October 1, 2010
The clearest, most user-friendly grammar for students (and parents) that I have ever seen is Anna Andresian's Looking at Latin. The explanations (one page for each topic--e.g., ablative of means on one page, another ablative use on another page) are written so they can be understood by somebody with little or no knowledge of Latin. Andresian is herself a teacher and this shows in how each page is set out. There are pictures that illustrate the topic along with examples in Latin and English. I would recommend this grammar to the parent who asked about an online resource. Looking at Latin comes as a book in print or an ebook. Also there are online exercises to accompany this book for which a site or individual license can be purchased. Also there is a free 7 day trial for the online exercises. I think this would be perfect for what this parent wanted.Go to the bolchazy website to find out more about this unique grammar. Also, I think the author is on Latinteach; you might ask if Andresian is on this list.
Review by: Wallace Ragan, Classical Outlook - September 1, 2008
"The goal of these pages is to provide students with essential form paradigms and grammatical explanations, comprehensive example sentences, and useful hints, all arranged in a visually appealing and unintimidating layout whose primary objective is clarity. It is my hope that this book will help students both learn and review Latin grammar and that it will enhance their ability to find answers and clarify confusion independently." These words from the Preface express every language instructor's goal and methodology. At a time and in a cultural climate that so little values methodical instruction in grammar, the Latin teacher is all the more challenged to find ways and means to inculcate this essential aspect of a classical and highly inflected language. Moreover, with the "reading method" holding sway in most pre-collegiate Latin classrooms, finding the time and tools to reinforce the grammar and syntax necessary to progress and understanding becomes of paramount importance in our pedagogy. Anna Andresian brings to Looking at Latin (LL) years of experience teaching Latin, clear insight into the language, and a creative enthusiasm for making the "medicine" of Latin grammar as palatable as possible. When considering the potential usefulness of LL, it is important to note that the text is intended for middle and secondary school students: details beyond what is essential to a pre-collegiate curriculum are omitted. Thus, those disposed to regard Gildersleeve and Lodge or Allen and Greenough as ideal reference grammars, may deem LL far from adequate. For the audience she aimed at, however, here is a text geared for and far more useful to younger students that those doughty tomes. The "guts" of Latin grammar are still here, presented logically and in a visually attractive-if necessarily simplistic-manner. Interested students (and teachers) can always find the 'deeper truths' of Latin grammar by excavating one of the larger reference works. The material in LL is arranged topically and in categories. There is no particular order-although the natural logic of moving from substantives to verbal elements is followed-so LL can be used to support any of the common textbooks. The Table of Contents is the source for topics and order of presentation. Such preliminary but essential matters as Noun Terminology, Agreement of Adjectives, and Verb Terminology are clearly and concisely introduced. Forms are laid out carefully in charts with boldface, color, and other devices used to highlight key and distinguishing features. Relevant exceptions to the rules are noted with helpful mnemonics (if available) and occasional examples. The author is thankfully aware of and sensitive to the more rarefied aspects of Latin grammar and endeavors to present such perennial challenges as participles, indirect statement, the subjunctive, and conditionals clearly and logically. Appendices of full paradigms complement and complete the text. In its presentation of the necessary forms and functions of Latin grammar and syntax ever likely to be encountered by pre-collegiate students, LL is commendable for its thoroughness and clarity. The goal of Latin pedagogy is naturally to move from objective presentation of the grammar to internal acquisition, apprehension and progressive expertise in translation. Ideally, even a "reference grammar" will reinforce and enhance understanding by presenting the material succinctly and with relevant illustrative examples. An important aspect of LL is "particular attention to visual cues," for, as the author states in the Preface, "their mnemonic power will facilitate students' acquisition of Latin grammar." Consistent with this goal, the text is replete with features to enable and enhance visual learning. On each page, material relevant to the grammatical topic is presented in flowchart fashion; crucial elements, terms, and concepts are highlighted with arrows, boxes, stars, and scrolls; short Latin sentences (with literal English translation) illustrating the topic are provided; the sentences and colorful cartoons mix Roman and a wide variety of modern cultural themes with a light touch, all intended both to illustrate the grammar and keep youthful attention. Potential vocabulary issues seem obviated by the clear translations of the Latin examples. How LL can be integrated into a Latin curriculum will vary with individual teaching styles, methods, and goals. An accurate, clear, and attractive presentation of Latin grammar can always be a useful ancillary text. Moreover, in our highly visual culture, pictorial aids are now an essential part of pedagogy, a fact from which teaching Latin is not exempt. There is no shortcut to memorizing the forms, of course, but creativity in presentation aids greatly in the challenge. LL endeavors to "visualize" Latin grammar and syntax for the interested and motivated student of this language. The approach generally engages attention and clarifies the grammatical construction under consideration. Indeed, one could wish the attractive pages of this valuable reference were individually available for overhead or PowerPoint use, to direct the attention of the entire class to the particular feature of grammar being considered.
Review by: Christine Sleeper, Postcard - November 8, 2006
The Looking at Latin text, which you so kindly and so generously sent to me created a sensation at the Euroclassicism meeting! Four or five of the teachers copied your name/address from the title page. It is a unique text! The illustrations are great fun!
Review by: L. N. Quartarone, Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR) - October 23, 2006
Anna Andresian, Looking at Latin: A Grammar for Pre-College. Wauconda, IL: Bolchazy-Carducci, 2006. Pp. viii, 280. ISBN 0-86516-615-3. $49.99. Reviewed by L.N. Quartarone, The University of Saint Thomas (lnquartarone@stthomas.edu) Word count: 2705 words ------------------------------- To read a print-formatted version of this review, see http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/bmcr/2006/2006-10-36.html ------------------------------- Looking at Latin, a supplementary grammar both intended for and developed from classroom presentations to middle and high school students, boasts in its preface that it provides "essential form paradigms and grammatical explanations, comprehensive example sentences, and useful hints, all arranged in a visually appealing and unintimidating layout whose primary objective is clarity" (ix). To a great extent, it successfully accomplishes its stated purpose. The arrangement is clear and well-organized, and the initial pages contain guidelines on use and an explanation of the notational style. The straightforward arrangement and presentation of grammatical constructs in chart or flow-chart format makes presentations easy to follow. Although Andresian (hereafter A.) appears to have made every effort to present information in both a detailed and logical format, at times the amount of detail involves so many boxes and arrows that the page appears crowded or overwhelming; however, the organization is always so apparent that even very detailed presentations (e.g., the present system, p. 160) display a clear format. Teachers will need to be aware, as with any ancillary text, that a presentation may include vocabulary or forms which the students have not yet encountered in their primary text and anticipate any difficulties this may cause. For example, A.'s excellent and detailed presentation of the relative pronoun (pp.113-137) employs both a superlative adjective and a subjunctive; if the primary text presents the relative pronoun before the superlative and subjunctive (as does Wheelock), these forms may be distracting. Nonetheless, this book would make an excellent companion to middle and high school texts, particularly those that employ the inductive method (e.g., the Oxford series), and could also be profitably employed as a morphological review text for upper level high school and lower division college classes. While the use of this book at the intended audience level would require students to have their own copy, college professors may find selected pages (used in overhead projection) useful for review sessions; they may also choose to make it available as an optional text, since its approach would be particularly helpful to those students who find themselves challenged by Latin. In short, employed at its intended audience level it is a superb text, and its comprehensiveness would make it useful even at the advanced level. The graphic illustrations are similar to those found in many modern language textbooks used at both the high school and college levels. They sometimes seem geared toward a younger audience but are not inappropriate for college level students. As a whole, this text capitalizes on the fact that today's students tend to be visually-oriented and -stimulated. For such learners, illustrations such as the that of a graduating student tossing her cap in the air (p. 10) may indeed make the accompanying vocabulary entry gaudium easier to remember. Although the illustrations sometimes seem tangentially related to the presented material (e.g., the automobile, p. 77), the majority provide welcome relief to routine matters and are not only amusing but easy to identify with, such as the captions accompanying the illustration of someone sitting next to a computer screen: diutissime exspectabo and minime patiens sum (p. 125). The Table of Contents lists six sections: Nouns, Adjectives and Adverbs, Pronouns, Etc., Verbs, Verb Moods, and Other Verb Constructions. Although within the text itself there are no header pages or tabs to separate the sections distinctly, there are footer labels. Each section contains a series of sub-sections or segments, e.g., under Nouns there are ten different segments including an introduction to nouns, an "overview" segment on forms which presents declensions and related matters (e.g., gender, case, etc.), separate segments for each of the cases (including vocative and locative) and a final segment on related matters such as prepositional phrases and appositives. Each segment comprises a sequence of focused, single-page presentations, e.g., the genitive case segment contains 14 pages, each one detailing some use of the genitive such as partitive, possessive, material, etc. All the single-page presentations take the form of flow charts or paradigm charts which could be scanned or copied onto an overhead for easy class presentation. Finally, the Appendices offer comprehensive paradigms similar to those found in most elementary texts and include irregular verbs. There are only a few occasions where the arrangement of the presentation seems questionable. For example, in Appendix B (p. 268), the inclusion of participles as a mood is misleading; however, the chart of 'Verb Forms' is a helpful tool presenting how all verb forms, including participles, derive from the present, perfect, and participial stems. The overall arrangement is straightforward and user-friendly. It would be cumbersome to comment in detail on every section, but in order to convey the text's comprehensiveness I will use the first section, Nouns, as an exemplum. It is arranged in a rather traditional sequence, beginning with simple presentations on "terminology" through one-page presentations on case, number, gender, declension (in concept) and dictionary entries. Each declension page includes how to form the stem, a chart of endings and a paradigm chart, with helpful notes regarding matters of gender, macrons, stem changes, etc. There is an appropriate breakdown of declensional types, e.g., second declension masculine nouns ending in -us and -r each have their own page; for those declensions with more than one nominative form (the second, third and fourth) there is also a final summary page. Common irregular nouns such as domus or vis each have their own page. Still in this section, there is a one-page presentation on definite and indefinite articles followed by several pages addressing case usage. A. issues warnings wherever there is potential for confusion, e.g., noting that the -um ending indicates different cases in different declensions. She has applied the useful term "nominusative" to neuter nouns (p. 10). Students should find particularly helpful features such as the separate presentations on the partitive genitive (pp. 31-32), where A. discusses those partitives that are best rendered by "of" in English (e.g.,nemo or pars) and those that are not (e.g., aliquid or satis); likewise, her presentation of the subjective (p. 34) and possessive (p. 30) uses of the genitive may truly help students making this distinction for the first time. Generally, presentations include a useful short list of the most pertinent vocabulary, e.g., a handy vocabulary list of various "time" words accompanies the accusative duration of time (p. 60) and ablatives of time when and within which (pp. 74-75). This ancillary feature helps students associate certain phrases with a particular grammatical construction; such helpful elements are an important benefit of A.'s text. For instance, she reminds students not to confuse the accusative duration of time with the ablative of time within which through its use of the English word "during" (p. 75), and her presentations of the ablative absolute (with separate treatments per tense of participle, pp. 81-83) introduce students to the important matter of considering the participle's time in relation to the main verb. Throughout the text A. is helpful and thorough. Laudably, there appears to have been an effort to streamline presentations by offering just the most important information, but at times some significant pointers have been omitted. For instance, on the first page of "Noun Terminology" (presenting the concept of noun case), all the English examples demonstrating the notion and use of the ablative case employ prepositions, but there is no accompanying statement, which would seem appropriate and helpful, that Latin words in the ablative case also often follow a preposition. The vocative case is not presented in any of the declension pages but suddenly appears in the "overview" (p. 22) accompanied by the directive "see p. 88 for more information on the vocative case." The simple explanation that the present participle in the ablative absolute employs the '-e' rather than the '-i' ending seems a lost opportunity to distinguish between the attribute and verbal uses of the present participle (p. 82) and would be consistent with the text's comprehensiveness. In most circumstances, however, such linkages are nicely executed; in the presentation of the genitive of description (p. 35), for example, parallel phrases, one employing the genitive and the other the ablative of description, demonstrate two ways of saying the same thing and direct the viewer to the presentation of the ablative of description (p. 73). On occasion better wording is warranted, despite the fact that this text is designed for a particular age group. For example, p. 3 in "Noun Terminology" introduces the concept of gender. At the bottom appears a warning box: "Gender matters! Different genders use slightly different endings, so you may misunderstand a noun's form if you do not know its gender." Similar phrasing is also used of conjugations: "It will be difficult to interpret verb endings correctly if you do not know the verb's conjugation" (p. 153). While these statements are true, it may be wiser to omit any reference to potential confusion and instead phrase warnings in a manner which emphasizes from the start that students will need to command certain information, e.g., "You will need to know a verb's conjugation in order to interpret its endings correctly." Similarly, on the dative with special verbs (p. 54), A.'s phrase "Verbing occurs and is directed toward the dative" seems more confusing than helpful. The apparently deliberately vague explanation of the dative and accusative with compound verbs (p. 55, "...the compound verb takes an accusative direct object and uses a dative to finish the thought") leaves some specificity to be desired. On pages 169, 171 and 173, "used with" would be preferable to "attached," since A.'s statements "When sum,es, est/eram, eras, erat/ero, eris, erit, etc. are attached to a 4th principal part..." suggest that the compound perfect passive forms consist of a single word, not two. Sentences that border on the nonsensical, even though such sentences achieve what they are meant to demonstrate, seem to be a feature of most introductory language texts. While A. has managed to avoid such phrases by and large, there are a few. For instance, I can think of no situation in which someone would say "you are looking through the thirteenth window" Per tertiam decimam fenestram spectas, p. 111, or "you arrived at the 35th minute", Tricesimo quinto momento pervenisti. Some, though unlikely, will serve to entertain (particularly the intended audience) while making the grammatical focus memorable:: Effugere ausus, papilio gladium tuum risit, "having dared to flee, the butterfly laughed at your sword" (p. 194) should encourage students to recall that the perfect passive participle of deponent and semi-deponent verbs is rendered actively. There are several apparent omissions which could give rise to questions or problems if a student is using the text on his/her own, but most could be easily addressed during class presentations. For example, A.'s presentation of the partitive genitive (p. 31) should include a note that numerals more often are followed by de or ex with the ablative case and a reference to the partitive ablative presented on p. 68. In the presentation of genitive with impersonal verbs on p. 42, a note offers the alternate construction employing the feminine ablative form of the possessive adjective (e.g., Illud mea referebat, "That was important to me") with no explanation that this is simply an alternate, parallel construction. The important note on assimilation (p. 55), containing only two exempla, should contain a link to a page explaining the process of the application of prefixes (which would be a worthwhile addition). On p. 77, it would be helpful to students to distinguish between the use of the ablative causa when used with either a preceding genitive (noun) or the possessive adjective by translating the ablative phrase differently (i.e., translating tua causa as "for your sake" instead of "because of you" could serve as a reminder that the Romans tended not to use the genitive of the personal pronouns (with the exception of partitive and objective genitives). The Latin sentences Te in speculo vides and Marcus te videt are missing from p. 131, and the phrase "Pronoun should not be reflexive" would be better rendered as "Pronoun is not reflexive." In the presentation of passive imperatives (p. 197), a note that the singular forms look like the present active infinitive is warranted. A reminder that the rare second and third person singular future imperative forms look the same would also be useful (p. 199). The presentation labeled "Sequence of Tenses in Dependent Clauses" (p. 231) seems designed to introduce students solely to the concept of the main verb establishing a time frame, as none of the example sentences actually introduces a dependent clause. One small inconsistency is that A. sometimes diverges from her general practice of presenting an idiomatic translation followed by a literal translation. For example, A.'s presentation of the genitive of value (p. 37) would be well served by more literal translations demonstrating how to translate the phrase by using the word "value" in English first, then altering it to a more colloquial _expression. Even this apparent shortcoming, however, could be addressed in class by asking students to explain how the example sentence Hunc ludum maximi facis, rendered as "You value this game very highly," would be translated more literally. The same practice (either offering a more literal translation in the text or having students in class explain how the more fluid translation issues from it) would also supplement the presentation of the genitive and accusative with impersonal expressions (p. 43). The presentation of the dative of possession (p.48) again omits the useful step of translating more literally; while it is often a good idea to encourage students to translate idiomatically, the absence of the initial, more literal step with this construction appears to have necessitated the note "The verb's number depends on the number of the things being possessed" -- which would have been unnecessary if the more literal translation for Cerbero sunt sex oculi, "there are six eyes to Cerberus" accompanied the idomatic "Cerberus has six eyes." The omission of literal translations, though, can be put to good use during the initial class presentation (by requiring students to think through the process) and thus is not a significant drawback, but it may hinder students using the text on their own. Bolchazy-Carducci publishers continues to serve the needs of fostering the learning of Classics in both lower and higher education. Since this text would lend itself to being purchased only by teachers and used solely for classroom presentations, the publisher may wish to consider issuing a version of this text that includes a CD containing all the presentations for easy electronic access. This would benefit both teachers by saving them time from scanning or making overheads and the publisher by allowing them to profit from this manner of using the text. Finally, kudos to both the author and the publisher for the obviously careful attention to editing. Considering the enormous amount of detail contained in this text, there are very few typographical errors, most of them minor in impact. What follows are all that I could find after careful scrutiny. There is a superfluous "E" after the plus sign in the center chart on p. 67. On p. 114, two instances of decem need to be changed to tria, to concur with the accompanying translation "3,000 stars." On p. 115, "probably" and "otherwise" would be better rendered as "either" and "or." On pages 176, 177, 178, 181 and 182, the box describing the formation of the perfect stem is superfluous, since the pages outline the present system and no perfect forms appear. On p. 183, 'system' is misspelled. Rana on p. 191 should be nominative, not ablative. The negation for the indirect command should be emended from ut ... non to ne on p. 238. For clarity, est should appear in the sentences exemplifying the relative clause of characteristic (p. 245). The description of the passive periphrastic in indirect statement (p. 258) would be clearer if accompanied by the direct statement (Discipulae docendae sunt). In the appendices, p. 269 presents all forms of rogare, but the gerund and supine use amare; also, there is inconsistency in the appearance of nominative endings of the participles in the perfect passive system. Macrons are missing from the second singular and plural and first singular perfect subjunctive forms of sum on p. 274. ------------------------------- The BMCR website (http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/bmcr/) contains a complete and searchable archive of BMCR reviews since our first issue in 1990. It also contains information about subscribing and unsubscribing from the service. Please do not reply to this email as this is an unmonitored mailbox. You can contact us by sending e-mail to bmr@ccat.sas.upenn.edu.
Review by: Sharon Kazmierski, Classical Outlook - August 1, 2006
THE ADVENTURES OF THE AMAZING MAGISTRULA By now, you have all heard about Nancy Pearl, the Seattle librarian and author who has her very own action doll that comes complete with "amazing shushing action!" But did you know that there is a Latin teacher out there with her very own action figure? It seems that about four years ago, Anna Andresian was teaching Latin at the Rocky Hill School in East Greenwich, Rhode Island. The Latin classroom was located right next to the preschool room. One day while digging through the toy chest a young child found a small doll that bore an uncanny resemblance to Anna and the rest is history. Mini Miss Andresian has become a legend in her own time and you can read all about her amazing adventures at http://www.magistrula.com. Regrettably, Mini Miss Andresian is not available in stores, but she does have a theme song and somewhat fanatical cadre of enemies, constantly plotting against her, I highly recommend that you visit this clever site. While you are browsing Magistrula.com, do take a look at Looking at Latin (ISBN 0-86516-615-3, TMRC B38), the Not So Mini Miss Anna Andresian's fabulous new grammar for pre-college students. This is possibly the most user-friendly Latin grammar ever published. Designed for middle and upper school students, Looking at Latin is a graphically rich reference that will definitely appeal to visual learners. Anna uses text boxes, flow charts, memory mapping, typography, color coding and humorous illustrations to maximum effect. Organized by grammatical topic, Looking at Latin is easily navigated and compatible with any Latin textbook program. The appendices provide a traditional summary of grammar. I have no doubt that college and university Latin students will want their own copies too! Although, priced at $49.95, the book is somewhat expensive, I believe that this is money well spent. This is a reference book that your students will use. My only complaint is that it is paperback, but a hardbound cover would have added considerably to the weight of this 288 page book. I would recommend laminating or reinforcing the cover because this book will see some serious action! To view the table of contents and sample pages, visit http://www.bolchazy.com. You may also direct questions to the publisher by contacting Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers Inc., 1000 Brown St., Unit 101, Wauconda IL 60084, tel. (800) 392-6453, fax (847) 526-2867.
Review: Wisconsin Bookwatch - June 1, 2006
from Wisconsin Bookwatch, June 2006 Looking At Latin Anna Andresian Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers 1000 Brown Street, Unit 101 Wauconda, IL 60084 0865166153 $49.99 www.bolchazy.com Providing the basic fundamental structures of a timeless language, Looking At Latin: A Grammar For Pre-College by Anna Andresian is an knowledgeably informed, expertly presented, and easy-to-follow ex-ploration of the Latin language specifically designed for Honors Studies and other pre-college students of Latin. Providing young readers with a comprehensive and "user-friendly" general understanding of Latin grammar, Looking At Latin includes a detailed table of contents enabling an easy-to-find mapping of the subject areas covered within its pages, grammatically arranged topics, dynamic layout complete with text boxes, arrows, examples, and color illustrations, and is expressly designed to target Latin students from middle school through high school. An impressive contribution to personal and school library Language Studies reference collections, Looking At Latin is very confidently recommended for novice students of Latin, as well as their classroom teachers and their supportive parents.
Review: The Clearing House - May 23, 2006
THE ADVENTURES OF THE AMAZING MAGISTRULA     By now, you've all heard about Nancy Pearl, the Seattle librarian and author who has her very own action doll that comes complete with "amazing shushing action!" But did you know that there's a Latin teacher out there with her very own action figure?   It seems that about four years ago, Anna Andresian was teaching Latin at the Rocky Hill School in East Greenwich, Rhode Island.  The Latin classroom was located right next to the preschool room. One day while digging through the toy chest a young child found a small doll that bore an uncanny resemblance to Anna and the rest is history. Mini Miss Andresian has become a legend in her own time and you can read all about her amazing adventures at http://www.magistrula.com. Regrettably, Mini Miss Andresian is not available in stores, but she does have a theme song and somewhat fanatical cadre of enemies, constantly plotting against her, I highly recommend that you visit this clever site.      While you're browsing Magistrula.com, do take a look at Looking at Latin (ISBN  0-86516-615-3), the Not So Mini Miss Anna Andresian's fabulous new grammar for pre-college students.  This is possibly the most user-friendly Latin grammar ever published.  Designed for middle and upper school students, Looking at Latin is graphically rich reference that will definitely appeal to visual learners. Anna uses text boxes, flow charts, memory mapping, typography, color coding and humorous illustrations to maximum effect.  Organized by grammatical topic, Looking at Latin is easily navigated and compatible with any Latin textbook program. The appendices provide a traditional summary of grammar. I have no doubt that college and university Latin students will want their own copies too!         Although, priced at $49.95, the book is somewhat expensive, I believe that this is money well spent.  This is a reference that your students will use. My only complaint is that it is paperback, but a hardbound cover would have added considerably to the weight of this 288 page book. I would recommend laminating or reinforcing the cover because this book will see some serious action!      To view the table of contents and sample pages, visit http://www.bolchazy.com.  You may also direct questions to the publisher by contacting Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers Inc., 1000 Brown St., Unit 101, Wauconda, Illinois 60084, tel.  (800) 392-6453, fax  (847) 526-2867. 
Review by: Vicki Wine, Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers - April 11, 2006
Spectacular! Grammar Right Before Your Eyes by Vicki Wine Another exciting product—still hot off the press—is available from Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers. Looking at Latin, a pre college Grammar by Anna Andresian, presents all the pieces of Latin grammar in visually engaging diagrams and cartoons. The diagrams, arrows, boxes, color, and formulas to explain the pattern all combine to render even the most complex structures comprehensible. Not only are the demonstrations energetic and clear, but the additional features of the book make it fun and easy to use. Both the complete index and the subject headings at the top and bottom of each page make any topic easy to find. The lessons are organized completely and logically but can be used in any order. The comprehensiveness of each grammatical category makes the book useful for later review. A set of these books in the classroom would add to the enjoyment of learning Latin and allow the teacher to concentrate more on reading. Any Latin students going further with their study will likely want their own copy for references. Even though the book is designed for middle school through high school students, college students will enjoy the light-hearted, campy humor and will welcome the guide to easier understanding. The illustrations add not only color and humor, but also contribute to the diversity of the modern world. In addition, the book presents a diversity of cultures. The dynamic presentation in this book makes Looking at Latin fun and engaging.
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